Cover illustration by Charles E. Martin for The New Yorker, December 9, 1967

The New Yorker: cover art by Charles E. Martin, December 9, 1967

Seven years before he created the cover depicted above, Charles E. Martin (1910-1995) conceived another cover for The New Yorker that appears to be based on a similar idea:

Cover illustration by Charles E. Martin for The New Yorker, December 3, 1960
Cover illustration by Charles E. Martin for The New Yorker, December 3, 1960

Charles E. Martin was a prolific and versatile American illustrator. From his official website:

Charlie created 187 original cover designs for the New Yorker magazine from 1938 to 1986. Two dozen additional cover designs were purchased but never published. His practice was to submit ideas for covers and cartoons as ‘roughs’ that were sent to the office. Every other Wednesday he would visit the art director, first Jim Geherty, then Lee Lorenz at the New York offices on 25 West 43th street opposite the Algonguin Hotel. The cover and cartoon submissions were evaluated, approved covers fine tuned and future ideas discussed. During the week he would create a finished cover which would be delivered to the magazine for publication. (New Yorker Covers)

Another way to learn more about Charles E. Martin is to watch the short (11 minutes) documentary created by his son Jared Martin, “C.E.M. a life in art”:

104 of Charles E. Martin’s cover are available for purchase over at the Condé Nast Store (including the two covers featured in this post).

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